Teaching Internet Research Skills
a seminar presented by Genie Tyburski

COURSE SECTIONS

Introduction

Myths & Misconceptions

Research Starting Points

Evaluative Skills

Hypothetical Research Exercises

Fact-Finding Exercises

NAVIGATION

Home

Search This Web

Site Map

SPONSORS

The Virtual Chase

Drexel University,
College of Information Science & Technology

MYTHS & MISCONCEPTIONS
Search Planning

Instruction style: Lecture-style with optional use of visual aids; also suitable for discussion

Description: To give patrons a step-by-step process by which to launch Internet research with a search engine or other search service.

  1. What is the question? Describe the information sought.

  2. Categorize the question. Does it pertain to:

    • A known work,

    • A topic,

    • An investigation (e.g., person, company, event),

    • A fact

  3. Categorize the information sought.

    • Current or historical?

    • Relevant to what discipline (e.g., law, medicine, history, etc.) How would you narrow the discipline (e.g. intellectual property law, biomedicine, WWII, etc.)?

    • An overview or in-depth coverage?

    • A familiar or unknown issue?

    • Target audience?

    • Other considerations (e.g., publication medium, reading level, source authenticity, etc.)

  4. Pull keywords from the description in number one above. Use unique words or multiple word phrases, when possible.

  5. Consider synonyms, misspellings, and colloquialisms, as well as broader and related concepts.

  6. Think about sources.

  7. Select an appropriate starting point (directories, search engines, meta search services, specialty search services).

    • Known work = go to it directly, or use search engine to find it

    • Topical research = subject directories, subject-specific sites, related government agencies, advocacy groups, or trade associations

    • Investigative research = multiple search engines, relevant databases

    • Factual, reference data = subject directories, sites devoted to collecting reference sources; for statistics, consider related government agencies

Recommended Resources:

  • How To Choose a Search Engine or Directory by University at Albany Libraries
  • How To Pick a Search Engine by The Virtual Chase
  • Important Things To Know Before You Begin Searching the Web by University of California, Berkley
  • PILOT Worksheet (worksheet for research planning) by Bailey Library, Slippery Rock, PA
  • Planning a Search Strategy, by Bailey Library, Slippery Rock, PA
  • Recommended Search Strategy by University of California, Berkley
  • Search Planning Worksheet by Workingfaster.com Inc.
  • Search Strategy Worksheet by Humboldt State University Library
  • Searching 101 by net.Tutor
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    The Virtual Chase
    a service of Ballard Spahr Andrews & Ingersoll, LLP

    Introduction | Myths & Misconceptions | Research Starting Points | Evaluative Skills | Hypothetical Research Exercises | Fact-Finding Exercises | Home | Search This Web | Site Map | The Virtual Chase | Drexel

    COPYRIGHT: 2000, 2001, 2002 Ballard Spahr Andrews & Ingersoll, LLP all rights reserved. Select graphics copyrighted by Art Today, Inc.
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    Our Terms and Conditions.

    Created: 9 October 2001
    Revised:
    URL:
    https://www.virtualchase.com/ResearchSkills/quick_search3.html
    Suggestions:
    Genie Tyburski,
    editor [at] virtualchase [dot] com