Teaching Internet Research Skills
a seminar presented by Genie Tyburski

COURSE SECTIONS

Introduction

Myths & Misconceptions

Research Starting Points

Evaluative Skills

Hypothetical Research Exercises

Fact-Finding Exercises

NAVIGATION

Home

Search This Web

Site Map

SPONSORS

The Virtual Chase

Drexel University,
College of Information Science & Technology

INTRODUCTION

Has the widespread availability of Web-based information skewed patrons' or clients' understanding of the differences between conducting keyword searching and performing research? Do they believe the same fee-based information you recommend exists somewhere on the Internet for free? Do they consistently use one search service? Do Internet-related terms confuse them? (What is the difference between the Web and the Internet? And why is knowing this important?) Does the thrill of finding information blind them to its questionable quality?

These represent some of the issues librarians, educators, and other Internet trainers face. How do we teach that keyword searching differs from research? That there are limits to the information available on the Internet. That search tools differ and do not provide access to all Web-enabled data. That all is not free. That whether free, or fee-based, users must evaluate information in order to assess its quality.

This workshop examines what constitutes searching for information and what comprises research. It examines common myths about conducting research on the Internet and recommends ways in which trainers may deal with them. It reviews noteworthy research starting points and discusses the role of search engines in Web-based research. It offers tools for teaching patrons how to assess quality in information and offers several fact-finding and research examples.

Attendees will review teaching techniques for debunking myths about Internet research, review and evaluate various research starting points, develop a checklist for evaluating the quality of information appearing on Web sites, and plan research strategies for solving a variety of hypothetical scenarios.

Additional Reading

Marylaine Block, Gullible's Travels, netConnect, Spr 2002.

Engine Power, Legal Assistant Today, Jul/Aug 2001.

A Topical Change of Habits, ABA Law Practice Management, May/June 2001.

The Skill of the Hunt, ABA Law Practice Management, Nov/Dec 2001.

Be a Web-Savvy Researcher, LLRX.com, November 1, 2000

ResearchWire: Some Final Thoughts on Internet Research, LLRX.com, May 1, 2000

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Created: 14 July 2000
Revised:
23 April 2003
URL:
https://www.virtualchase.com/ResearchSkills/intro.html
Suggestions:
Genie Tyburski,
editor [at] virtualchase [dot] com